Logos

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(Millefiori technique by JoeMichaels 70)
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Here was my setup, including: aluminum foil, pasta maker, polymer clay, x-acto knife, paper logos, cardboard cutting surface, and of course, not shown: damp paper towel
 
Here was my setup, including: aluminum foil, pasta maker, polymer clay, x-acto knife, paper logos, cardboard cutting surface, and of course, not shown: damp paper towel
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Revision as of 20:13, 1 July 2008

Sometimes painting a logo, insignia, or patch by hand is impossible or impractical. You want the added detail that those offer but lack the ability to paint it accurately at such a small scale. For those times several different techniques can be used.

Labels

Labels are probably the most popular route for producing high quality miniature pictures of a logo. Several companies offer model or water slide decal stickers that can be used with your computer printer so you can print whatever you want. In some instances regualr mailing labels can even be used. Some online dealers have popped up recently who also provide quality stickers for most of the GI Joe specific type logos for figures and vehicles.

Millefiori technique by JoeMichaels 70

Like all of us do, normally when I need a logo on a figure, I either print one on the computer, or try to steadily paint one on. My usual results include a printed logo that has lost too much detail, or a painted sloppy mess. For the last NJC (BPRD) I wanted to make small belt-buckle BPRD logos for my figures, and thought I'd try something new -- at least new for me & customizing joes -- millefiori.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Millefiori

Here was my setup, including: aluminum foil, pasta maker, polymer clay, x-acto knife, paper logos, cardboard cutting surface, and of course, not shown: damp paper towel Jm1.gif

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