Custom Weapons

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<blockquote>
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==Summary==
Sometimes, a mediocre G.I. Joe figure can be made a fan-favorite simply because of his accessories. The same is true of customs. With so many great weapons in the Joe line, there's a lot to choose from when making a custom. But if you want to give your figure some extra pizzazz, custom accessories are a great way to go.
+
Sometimes, a mediocre G.I. Joe figure can be made a fan-favorite simply because of his accessories. The same is true of customs. With so many great weapons in the Joe line, there's a lot to choose from when making a custom. But if you want to give your figure some extra pizzazz, custom accessories are a great way to go.
</blockquote>
+
  
<hr noshade>
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==Tools==
<b>Tools</b>
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* X-acto Knif
<hr noshade>
+
* Krazy/Super Glue
 +
* Elmer's Glue
 +
* Spray Sealant
  
<blockquote>
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==How To Do It==
      <ul>
+
I'm going to illustrate how to customize a gun, but the same directions could also be applied to backpacks and other accessories.
        <li>X-acto Knife</li>
+
        <li> Krazy/Super Glue</li>
+
        <li>Elmer's Glue</li>
+
        <li> Spray Sealant</li>
+
      </ul>
+
</blockquote>
+
  
<hr noshade>
+
An alternate clip, the removal or addition of a scope, or a shoulder strap can make a boring gun look really cool. As an example, I'll walk through adding a new clip, (though the same directions also apply to scopes and stuff). Just find the one you want to add and hack it off of the donor gun with your knife. Next, cut the original clip off of the weapon you want to customize.
<b>How To Do It</b>
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<hr noshade>
+
  
<blockquote>
+
Krazy glue on the new clip. Don't be too concerned if it's not positioned exactly straight right off the bat. Give the glue a few minutes to get tacky, and you'll be able to fix the clip into any position you want. After that, it's a good idea to apply some more Krazy glue around the seams.
<p>I'm going to illustrate how to customize a gun, but the same
+
        directions could also be applied to backpacks and other accessories. </p>
+
      <p> An alternate clip, the removal or addition of a scope, or a shoulder
+
        strap can make a boring gun look really cool. As an example, I'll
+
        walk through adding a new clip, (though the same directions also apply
+
        to scopes and stuff). Just find the one you want to add and hack it off
+
        of the donor gun with your knife. Next, cut the original clip off of the
+
        weapon you want to customize.</p>
+
      <p> Krazy glue on the new clip. Don't be too concerned if it's
+
        not positioned exactly straight right off the bat. Give the glue a few
+
        minutes to get tacky, and you'll be able to fix the clip into any
+
        position you want. After that, it's a good idea to apply some more
+
        Krazy glue around the seams.
+
      </p>
+
</blockquote>
+
  
<hr noshade>
+
==Reinforcing it==
<b>Reinforcing it</b>
+
When the Krazy glue is dried, the next step is to reinforce the new piece against breakage. Water down some Elmer's glue so until it's of a very watery consistency. Then, brush it over the clip and the weapon. After it dries, repeat the process until there's about 4-5 coats. This will help cover up any small holes you may have missed, as well as creating a sort of "shell" that contains the clip and the gun. It won't make it as sturdy as if the pieces were actually both part of the same mold, but it'll help a great deal.
<hr noshade>
+
  
 +
==Painting
 +
Since you've gone through all the trouble to customize the weapon, go the extra mile and paint some of the details that Hasbro molded into the weapon, (when applicable).
  
<blockquote>
+
I've noticed that, when you paint something that's been covered in Elmer's glue, the paint has a tendency to get crack marks in it, (at least with acrylics). To avoid this, simply spray a coat of paint sealant over the piece. After that, the paint will coat just fine.
<p>When the Krazy glue is dried, the next step is to reinforce the new
+
        piece against breakage. Water down some Elmer's glue so until it's
+
        of a very watery consistency. Then, brush it over the clip and the weapon.
+
        After it dries, repeat the process until there's about 4-5 coats.
+
        This will help cover up any small holes you may have missed, as well as
+
        creating a sort of "shell" that contains the clip and the
+
        gun. It won't make it as sturdy as if the pieces were actually both
+
        part of the same mold, but it'll help a great deal. </p>
+
</blockquote>
+
  
<hr noshade>
+
And that's it! Now you've got a cool custom weapon that's never been seen on any G.I. Joe figure before.
<b>Painting</b>
+
<hr noshade>
+
  
<blockquote>
+
==Other General Tips==
<p>Since you've gone through all the trouble to customize the weapon,
+
* Start simple. Don't try to turn a pistol into a sniper rifle as your first accessory custom. Doing a few clip or scope changes will help you familiarize yourself with the process so that you are able to take on more complex projects later on.
        go the extra mile and paint some of the details that Hasbro molded into
+
* Be just as careful with a custom weapon as you would be with a custom figure.
        the weapon, (when applicable).</p>
+
* Avoid adding stocks. Because of the way most figures hold their guns, there is a lot of pressure put on the stock. This usually results in the breakage of the weapon. If you want your figures to hold their weapons realistically, I'd suggest not trying to add stocks with the method    described here.
      <p>I've noticed that, when you paint something that's been covered
+
        in Elmer's glue, the paint has a tendency to get crack marks in
+
        it, (at least with acrylics). To avoid this, simply spray a coat of paint
+
        sealant over the piece. After that, the paint will coat just fine.</p>
+
      <p>And that's it! Now you've got a cool custom weapon that's
+
        never been seen on any G.I. Joe figure before. <br>
+
      </p>
+
</blockquote>
+
  
<hr noshade>
+
contributor(s): Grand Slam
<b>Other General Tips</b>
+
<hr noshade>
+
 
+
<blockquote><ul>
+
        <li>Start simple. Don't try to turn a pistol into a sniper rifle
+
          as your first accessory custom. Doing a few clip or scope changes will
+
          help you familiarize yourself with the process so that you are able
+
          to take on more complex projects later on.
+
        </li>
+
        <li>Be just as careful with a custom weapon as you would be with a custom
+
          figure.
+
        </li>
+
        <li>Avoid adding stocks. Because of the way most figures hold their guns,
+
          there is a lot of pressure put on the stock. This usually results in
+
          the breakage of the weapon. If you want your figures to hold their weapons
+
          realistically, I'd suggest not trying to add stocks with the method
+
          described here.
+
        </li>
+
      </ul>
+
</blockquote>
+
 
+
<div align="right" class="tinytext"> Contributor(s): Grand Slam</div>
+

Revision as of 10:54, 14 October 2005

Contents

Summary

Sometimes, a mediocre G.I. Joe figure can be made a fan-favorite simply because of his accessories. The same is true of customs. With so many great weapons in the Joe line, there's a lot to choose from when making a custom. But if you want to give your figure some extra pizzazz, custom accessories are a great way to go.

Tools

  • X-acto Knif
  • Krazy/Super Glue
  • Elmer's Glue
  • Spray Sealant

How To Do It

I'm going to illustrate how to customize a gun, but the same directions could also be applied to backpacks and other accessories.

An alternate clip, the removal or addition of a scope, or a shoulder strap can make a boring gun look really cool. As an example, I'll walk through adding a new clip, (though the same directions also apply to scopes and stuff). Just find the one you want to add and hack it off of the donor gun with your knife. Next, cut the original clip off of the weapon you want to customize.

Krazy glue on the new clip. Don't be too concerned if it's not positioned exactly straight right off the bat. Give the glue a few minutes to get tacky, and you'll be able to fix the clip into any position you want. After that, it's a good idea to apply some more Krazy glue around the seams.

Reinforcing it

When the Krazy glue is dried, the next step is to reinforce the new piece against breakage. Water down some Elmer's glue so until it's of a very watery consistency. Then, brush it over the clip and the weapon. After it dries, repeat the process until there's about 4-5 coats. This will help cover up any small holes you may have missed, as well as creating a sort of "shell" that contains the clip and the gun. It won't make it as sturdy as if the pieces were actually both part of the same mold, but it'll help a great deal.

==Painting Since you've gone through all the trouble to customize the weapon, go the extra mile and paint some of the details that Hasbro molded into the weapon, (when applicable).

I've noticed that, when you paint something that's been covered in Elmer's glue, the paint has a tendency to get crack marks in it, (at least with acrylics). To avoid this, simply spray a coat of paint sealant over the piece. After that, the paint will coat just fine.

And that's it! Now you've got a cool custom weapon that's never been seen on any G.I. Joe figure before.

Other General Tips

  • Start simple. Don't try to turn a pistol into a sniper rifle as your first accessory custom. Doing a few clip or scope changes will help you familiarize yourself with the process so that you are able to take on more complex projects later on.
  • Be just as careful with a custom weapon as you would be with a custom figure.
  • Avoid adding stocks. Because of the way most figures hold their guns, there is a lot of pressure put on the stock. This usually results in the breakage of the weapon. If you want your figures to hold their weapons realistically, I'd suggest not trying to add stocks with the method described here.

contributor(s): Grand Slam

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